Bravo Gurgaon: Implementing a Step By Step CFD Strategy


(This is an excellent example of what CFDs are for. Step by step innovation)

MCG plans to lay cycle tracks in all major roads within 3 years

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Following and learning from Johannesburg’s EcoMobility Month

South Africa Joburg big sign change the way you move

The city of Johannesburg has over the month of October engaged in an interesting experiment to limit car circulation and encourage softer means of getting to and around in a portion of their central business district, Sandton.  The project was planned and carried out in cooperation with ICLEI’s EcoMobiity program, and is the second in a series which began in 2013 in Suwon Korea, and which in 2017 will move on to the City of Kaohsiung, the second city of Taiwan.

World Streets has made an effort to follow the Johannesburg project and in cooperation with local transport, city planning and environment groups, in an effort to piece together a balanced picture of how all this is working out. If you click to the following hot links, you will be taken in a first instance to the twenty or so postings that appeared in our World Streets Online Facebook page at And following that to a Google summary of the latest media coverage.

* For World Streets coverage of EcoMobility 2015 ->

* For latest media coverage of Johannesburg event ->

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Keynote : International Forum on Livable City and Eco-Mobility – Hsinchu, Taiwan. 29 January 2015

taiwan Hsinchu eb in traffic smaller long

Intersection in the central  OSK  demonstration site

The following PowerPoint slides were created to accompany a fifty minute keynote address by the editor of World Streets to the International Forum on Livable City and Eco-Mobility hosted by the Hsinchu city government in Taiwan on 29 January 2015. (A video of the address to be made shortly available.)

The presentation addresses and comments on the challenges being faced by this recently elected new administration, including in the context of his book in progress “Convergence: General Theory of Transport in Cities “, with discussion as well of sections of the recently published book of the Canadian urbanist and writer Charles Montgomery, “Happy City: Transforming Our Lives through Urban Design”.

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Whoops! How Planners and Engineers Badly Overestimate Car Traffic

From Streetsblog Daily, 12 Dec 2014 06:56 AM PST

Streetsblog - Trip generation manualHow much car traffic will a new building generate? Engineers and planners are constantly trying to divine the answer to this question in the belief that it will tell them the “right” number of parking spaces to build, or how to adjust streets to accommodate more cars.

This is the bible for planning infrastructure around new developments. Is it wildly wrong? Image: Access Magazine

The standard reference to guide these decisions is the Trip Generation Manual published by the Institute for Transportation Engineers. But the manual has come under fire for overestimating the traffic produced by mixed-use developments. A team of transportation engineers aligned with the Congress for the New Urbanism has been working on a fix for that.

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Pay-As-You-Drive Vehicle Insurance: Is it in the cards as a new mobility strategy?

This white paper  by Todd Litman of the Victoria Transport Policy Institute, just issued the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, looks at the potential  for Pay as you Drive (PAYD) insurance both in general and in the specific case of British Columbia. With Pay as you Drive – i.e., “context sensitive insurance”  — what you pay for this big-ticket item is conditional on not only distance travelled but also time and place. The concept has been around for decades but has started to gain traction in the last half dozen years. Let’s have a look. Continue reading

“Carsharing will ease Shanghai’s traffic problems”

We very much like this article that has just appeared in, in that it provides an example of how good new mobility ideas that have enjoyed a certain success in one place — in this instance the long time carsharing project of the City of Bremen — can start to make their way into other cities and parts of the world. Will this actually work out for Shanghai? Well at least it’s a start. Continue reading