Seventeen plus 1 reasons why I am prudently optimistic about the Sustainability Transition for 2018-2020

Shortlist of Transformative Realities and Trends

eb-tallinn-statementOne of the great recompenses of having watched the sustainable transportation and related technology developments evolve over the course of several decades, is that if one takes the time to step back and scan the evidence for pattern breaks, one can readily spot a certain number of  trends, fundamental structural changes, quite a few of which bode well for a different and better future for transport in and around cities. Here are a handful of the fundamental underlying changes which I have spotted over the last decades and which I would like to share with you this morning.

Let’s start with a simple listing and then go on to brief comments in an attempt to clarify.

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Outreach for success: Local actors & implementation partners

Too often when it comes to new transport initiatives, the practice is to concentrate on laying the base for the project in close working relationships with people and groups who a priori are favorably disposed to your idea, basically your choir. Leaving the potential “trouble makers” aside for another day. Experience shows that’s a big mistake. We have to take a . . .
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AFRICA STREETS 2018: LETTER OF INVITATION. 

FB AS

Another day in morning traffic in Lagos

AFRICA STREETS:

Stories of New Mobility Projects in Africa: Successes, Failures and Work in Progress

* * *  In this first week we have thus far heard from colleagues in Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria and Zambia, though at this point these are just exploratory conversations. We hope to have at least ten telling and varied stories, hopefully more. * * *

Dear African friends and colleagues,

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Changing behavior, changing the world . . with four little words

eyes-on-the-street-ula-slawinska

Source: From the New Mobility Fine Arts Collection at https://www.facebook.com/NewMobilityArts/

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The Mobility Complex: John Whitelegg lights a fire.

Important announcement: Mobility has been priced to  move. Available in both paper and eBook form for less than USD 10.00. See http://tinyurl.com/zxclcz4
(Thank you John for thinking about students, fund-strapped NGOs and readers in developing, smaller cities with tight budgets.)

john-whitelegg-inter-view-with-satnam-rana-smaller

John Whitelegg, Professor John Whitelegg, is a remarkable man. He has spent his entire professional life as a scholar, teacher, critic, publisher, activist and politician, trying to make sense out of our curious world and the contradictions of transport and mobility. And in a successful attempt to bring all the threads together, what he has learned about our topic in three decades of international work spanning all continents, he has just produced for our reading and instruction a remarkable and, I truly believe, much-needed book.  His title gives away the game – Mobility: Transport Planning Philosophy for a Sustainable Future.

 

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To fix Sustainable Transport: Ensure Full Gender Parity in all Decision and Investment Fora (QED)

Here we go again. Every day is a great day for World Streets to announce publicly, loudly and yet once again our firm belief that the most important single thing that our society, our nations and our cities, could do to increase the fairness and the effectiveness of our transportation arrangements would be to make it a matter of the law that all decisions determining how taxpayer money is invested in the sector should be decided by councils that respect full gender parity. We invite you to join us in this challenge and make it one of the major themes of sustainable transport policy worldwide in the year immediately ahead.

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Sustainable Transportation – 101 Things You Have to Keep Your Eye On

brain2One of the reasons why such a small proportion of the world cities are working on having more sustainable transportation systems has to do with the fact that these are literally “complex systems”, a category of social and economic interactions which is far more complicated than laying down additional meters of concrete.

A complex system is filled with nuances and surprises, as a result of the fact that all of the bits and pieces that constitute them interact with each other, and all too often yields contradictory results which are quite opposite from what the initial practitiones or policymakers may have wished to bring about.  The classic example of this is of course the discredited “predict and provide” approach to transport which famously creates a mindset which consistently favors more traffic.  So even with all of the goodwill and hope in the world, many of these policies or approaches achieve results which are contrary to the initial expectations and often deleterious.

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A Think-Tank is Neither to Tarnish nor Burnish <—

Malaysia Penang Pedestrian in King crosswalk

* Civil society under attack in Penang Malaysia: This letter to the editor in response to warning issued to civil society by Penang’s Chief Minister

– By TK Chua, 8 July 2016 m.malaysiakini.com

Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng is under a lot of pressure lately. However, his advice to Penang Institute, the think-tank funded by the state government, not to tarnish but burnish the image of the state government, needs some comments.

I think the purpose of a think-tank is neither to tarnish nor burnish the image of the state government. Both would be wrong.

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Feminism and Sustainable Development in the Ukraine

Ukraine femnist poster

 

I have just received a term paper from Iryna Poliukhovych, an International MBA candidate from the Ukraine, studying on a joint Erasmus program in Poland and Paris, on the topic of “Feminism and Sustainable development in Ukraine”, presented for my graduate seminar on Sustainable Development, Economy and Democracyhttp://sustain.ecoplan.org – at the Institut Supérieur de Gestion (Paris).  The report is available  for review and comment at  https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B41h-Am2TpUHYXBsUTlNS29kTkk. To give you a taste for the rfull eport, below you will find  her comments on the history of the women’s movement in the Ukraine.

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Brainstorming the Penang Transport Master Plan(s)

Penang MP Poster top illustrationDraft introduction: Welcome to a collaborative thinking exercise inviting  any and all who may have some questions about the focus, the vision and in the end the quality of future mobility services as being proposed and aggressively pushed by the state government of Penang. The central instrument for this group investigative process is a group of poster illustrations which combine simple images and a few telling words in order test our understanding of the Penang Transport Master Plan — all this as  prepared for the recent Gertak Sanggul Art Festival by Kin Yin and a group  of young collaborators (who will be identified shortly in the final section of this first presentation).

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Seventeen plus 1 reasons why I am prudently optimistic about the Sustainability Transition for 2016-2020

Shortlist of Transformative Realities and Trends

eb-tallinn-statementOne of the great recompenses of having watched the sustainable transportation and related technology developments evolve over the course of several decades, is that if one takes the time to step back and scan the evidence for pattern breaks, one can readily spot a certain number of fundamental structural changes, quite a few of which bode well for a different and better future for transport in and around cities. Here are a handful of the fundamental underlying changes which I have spotted over the last decades and which I would like to share with you this morning.

Let’s start with a simple listing and then go on to brief comments in an attempt to clarify.  (Note; this is part of a series of Op-Eds that will continue over the month of January 2016.)

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Gatnet 2.0: Gearing up for 2016

Dear Gatnet Friends and Colleagues,
zetabyte-image-largeWhen Priyanthi Fernando decided to invite an innovative month-long peer dialogue on Gender Mainstreaming in Rural Transport in November, I was fascinated by her idea on several scores.  First, the topic itself and very curious to see what the 150 or so people from various corners of the world signed into Gatnet would have to share and create together on this subject. And second, I was intrigued to see how our somewhat sagging original Dgroups website package was going to be able to support these exchanges. So I decided to jump in with both feet and as the exchanges moved along, I was struck by two things in turn.

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Survival of the Fittest – Gender and Public Transport in Kathmandu

Nepal crowding minibus women

* Click for 4 minute video: http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/video/2014/03/17/gender-public-transport-in-nepal

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New Gatnet 2.0 Combined Search Engine – Trial run

magnifying glassWe invite you to try this on the topic of our November Dialogue led by Pri  in Dgroups Gatnet site at https://dgroups.org/worldbank/gatnet/ .
 
1. Call up our in-process Gatnet 2.0 search engine – https://goo.gl/EOjBpI
 
2. Pop in the following keywords: “gender mainstreaming rural transport”
 
3. Have a look and if your time permits it would be useful for improving this tool if you might share your comments and suggestions.
 
That’s just one way of checking it out. You will quickly see its potential.
 
Again, your critical comments and suggestions more than welcome
# # #

WOMEN, CYCLING, ETC. – A CONVERSATION AMONG FRIENDS

(An unstructured chat among fellow cyclists. Definitely  not a questionnaire) 

children with push balance bikesA. YOU AND CYCLING

1. You are a woman    YES________/No __________

2. You have a bicycle  YES________/No __________

3. You ride a bicycle fairly often in your day to day life as “normal transport:  YES______/No ____

4. You find that is not always that easy, safe or agreeable to use a bike in your city. YES____/No _____ (City name)_______________________________

5. You understand that in different places/cultures actually having and riding a bike for a woman is not all that easy, for many reasons. . . YES________/No ______________

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Discussion: Gender Mainstreaming in Rural Transport

gender mainstreaming

  • Posted by Priyanthi Fernando, , who is leading this initiative.

Welcome to old and new members of GATNET and to the discussion on Gender Mainstreaming in the Rural Transport. Apologies for the delay in starting, and thank you to all those who signed up early for their patience. We needed to send the message out to IFRTD s and ReCAP s communities of practice the response was very good, and according to Eric Britton, we GATNET comprises 169 members from 46 different countries. An opportunity for sharing a wide range of experiences!

So here is the formal introduction to the discussion with an outline of what form it will take.

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Invisibilities: How to look at (for) something that is purported to be invisible

MAN HEAD IN SAND

In the city, as in life, as we make our way around it we normally register only what we set out to look for. The anomalies, the absences, the troubling, somehow escape our attention. Consciously or not. But when it comes to matters of transport and public spaces, everywhere the eye might wander there are valuable clues, both visible and invisible, for planners, policy makers and the concerned citizen. However, if we fail to use our eyes we miss out on valuable information. And as a result our cities do just that much less well.

With this in mind we have made a selection of fifty wildly different photographs from the working archives of World Streets, which have been culled from more than three thousand  images and which one by one can help us to  better understand the almost infinitely variable challenges of sustainable transport, sustainable cities and sustainable lives.  I call these  “Invisibilities” reminding us to all of the many things that go on in our sector which we often fail to look at. This is a universal problem, and my hope here is to encourage us all, myself included, to be more fully attentive to the human side of transportation.

(We propose that you look at this with the full screen setting bottom right just above.)

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Invisibilities: How to look at (for) something that is purported to be invisible

MAN HEAD IN SAND

In the city, as in life, as we make our way around it we normally register only what we set out to look for. The anomalies, the absences, the troubling, somehow escape our attention. Consciously or not. But when it comes to matters of transport and public spaces, everywhere the eye might wander there are valuable clues, both visible and invisible, for planners, policy makers and the concerned citizen. However, if we fail to use our eyes we miss out on valuable information. And as a result our cities do just that much less well.

With this in mind we have made a selection of fifty wildly different photographs from the working archives of World Streets, which have been culled from more than three thousand  images and which one by one can help us to  better understand the almost infinitely variable challenges of sustainable transport, sustainable cities and sustainable lives.  I call these  “Invisibilities” reminding us to all of the many things that go on in our sector which we often fail to look at. This is a universal problem, and my hope here is to encourage us all, myself included, to be more fully attentive to the human side of transportation.

(We propose that you look at this with the full screen setting bottom right just above.)

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From the Archives: To achieve Sustainable Transport, Militate for Full Gender Parity in all Planning, Decision, Investment and Implementation Bodies.

First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

On the occasion of the one hundredth anniversary of International Women’s Day:
Today, 8 March 2011 is International Women’s Day, the one hundredth anniversary of
this great and necessary idea. So what better occasion for World Streets to announce publicly, loudly and yet once again our firm belief that the most important single thing that our society, our nations and our cities could do to increase the fairness and the effectiveness of our transportation arrangements would be to make it a matter of the law that all decisions determining how taxpayer money is invested in the sector should be decided by councils that respect full gender parity. We invite you to join us in this challenge and make it one of the major themes of sustainable transport policy worldwide in the year immediately ahead.

cropped-colombia-bogota-transmilleneo-inside4.jpg

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