Victoria Transport Policy Institute. – Summer 2019  Vol. 19, No. 2

vtpi 2 LITMAN CANADA

The Victoria Transport Policy Institute is an independent research organization dedicated to developing innovative solutions to transportation problems. The VTPI website (http://www.vtpi.org ) has many resources addressing a wide range of transport planning and policy issues. VTPI also provides consulting services.

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DECONGESTION – 7 Steps for Mayors and other City Leaders to cut traffic congestion without the expense of new roads or annoyed residents’

Decongestion

Houston, we have a problem

Our cities are in crisis because they revolve around the car. It’s killing us, our communities and our economy.

Traffic congestion is one of the most significant problems and issues facing Governments, Councils and businesses around the world. In Australia, more than 80% of all trips are made by car and in New Zealander 83% of trips less than 2km are made by car. A British Social Attitudes Survey found that 71% of adults never cycle. Only 3% of Brits cycle every day or nearly every day. There are as many as 38 million empty car seats on the UK’s roads every rush hour.

“The problem is we’re all doing the same things – commuting, business trips and the school run – making the same trips by car at the same time, creating gridlock, congestion, queuing and travel delays’ says Transport Planner and Behaviour Change expert Rachel Smith.

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DEVELOPMENT URBANISM: Brainstorming another kind of urban development

Vertical kitchen garden @ Henrik Valeur, 2014

Vertical kitchen garden – Henrik Valeur, 2014

Call by Henrik Valeur for an international collaborative brainstorm

Development urbanism is a theory in progress about the possible use of urban development as a means to combat poverty and protect the environment.

The concept of development urbanism can be seen as an alternative to the concept of smart city. Says Valeur: “There are obviously too many unresolved problems in our cities today, but my point is that many of these problems can be solved by very simple and inexpensive means. Smart technologies are rarely necessary and may, in fact, create more problems than they solve

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