Transport and Climate Change: 2006 Perspectives

Climate temperature anomolies global time series

Here we are, it’s 2019, but how did all this look a dozen years ago? In this broad-based overview article published in 2006, Professor Lee Chapman of the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Science at University of Birmingham,  reviews the impact of various modes of transport with respect to climate change inducing greenhouse gas emissions and discusses ways in which society can adapt to reduce the impacts. Let’s take a look and see what has changed, what has been done, and what has been learned..

This paper reviews the impact of various modes of transport with respect to climate change inducing greenhouse gas emissions and discusses ways in which society can adapt to reduce the impacts.

Continue reading

The Future of Mobility 3.0. (Report)

Reinventing mobility in the era of disruption and creativity

Arthur D. Little has just released the third edition of its Future of Mobility study, including an updated version of its Urban Mobility Index, which ranks 100 global cities based on the maturity, innovativeness and performance of their urban mobility systems. The study, “The Future of Mobility 3.0 Reinventing mobility in the era of disruption and creativity”, was launched at the UITP Asia-Pacific Assembly in Taipei.

Arthur D. Little highlights what is holding cities back, and, together with its partner the UITP – the International Association of Public Transport – identifies three strategic directions for cities to better shape the future of urban mobility. The study also describes 25 imperatives to consider when defining sustainable urban mobility policies and case studies of cities demonstrating good practice.

This report is a good read and test ground for your own ideas. A copy of the study can be downloaded from   https://bit.ly/2qrDDH4 . Now let’s see if we can get you started. 

Continue reading

World Transport Policy & Practice. Vol. 24 No.1. March 2018

Editorial

This issue brings together two important strands of thinking in sustainable mobility and the bigger picture around how the world is changing and now faces a rather stark choice.  We can either go down the route of high quality, people-centred, healthy, active, child-friendly cities or we can finish the job started  by Henry Ford and  shape a future dominated by vehicles and technology, exterminate  walking, cycling and public transport and deeply entrench our total submission to a space greedy, dollar-greedy, unhealthy technological domination of the way we live.  The latter is the world of electric vehicles and autonomous vehicles (AVs) and is now attracting large scale support and buy-in from politicians, corporations and environmental groups.

* Full text available here – https://goo.gl/9aecLD

Continue reading