WORTHY MOUSE FAMILY TRAGICALLY LOSES HOME: SLEEPS IN CAR

Famiy Mouse cover page car and family

– – – – – – – – > by Eric the Crow, Reportng for World Streets, from Reykjavik Iceland

eric crow stop the road 2019Someone a lot wiser than me, once told me many years ago: when you are facing a really difficult problem, why don’t you see if you can step back a few paces and put it in a form that you can discuss with children and hear what they may have to say.
I recalled this in the early nineties when in the face of the many mind-bending complications of sustainability and mobility — such as we are facing here today — I decided to write a Haiku which gradually expanded from seventeen syllabes into a wandering draft scenario for a children’s story on the topic, which eventually became, with the great shaping inputs of two of my friends (Wolfgang Zuckermann for the words, and Roget Tweet for the music (artwork) ).  After much thrashing around we decided to call it  Family Mouse behind the Wheel (Wolfgang’s candidate).

Want to check it out?

To read this tragedi-environmental tale with backstrory all you have to do is click here – – > https://worldstreets.wordpress.com/2016/05/11/family-mouse-behind-the-wheel/

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Action Agenda on Safe Walking for Africa’s Children

The trip to school

The trip to school. One more  morning trip on the roads of Africa

Dear Eric,

We are proud to announce the release of a new report, Step Change: An Action Agenda on Safe Walking for Africa’s Children, that Amend has produced in collaboration with the FIA Foundation and the Global Initiative for Child Health and Mobility.

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Family Mouse Behind the Wheel

Of Mice, of Men and . . . of Penang

erc the crow with sign seatedWhen I first visited Penang back in late summer 2013 in response to an invitation by Think City, I had several weeks to profit from a steady diet of site visits, lectures, master classes and intense skull sessions with ten different key groups (including media, local government, transport operators, auto industry and lobby, regulators and police, gender balance, cycling and pedestrian groups, civil society, the universities, and finally “hacking sustainable mobility”). All of which, as I travelled around both the island and mainland, gave me an excellent occasion to start to get a feel for both “halves” of Penang.  Not a city, not a state, but in fact an in many ways typical and varied metropolitan area.

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PENANG AND THE FAMILY MOUSE (7)

It’s getting late in Penang so we cannot read the whole story to you tonight.  So we have to stop here when the well-connected Beaver Construction company showed up, without any prior public notice, to start the work on the road.  And the first victims were, of course, the trees.

Fam Mouse - page 6

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PENANG AND THE FAMILY MOUSE (1)

Someone a lot wiser than me, once told me many years ago: when you are facing a really different problem, why don’t you see if you can step back a few paces and put it in a form that you can discuss with children and hear what they may have to say.

I recalled this in the early nineties when in the face of the many mind-bending complications of sustainability and mobility — such as we are facing here today — I decided to write a little scenario for a children’s story on the topic, which eventually became, with the great shaping inputs of two of my friends (Wolfgang Zuckermann for the words, and Roget Tweet for the music), Family Mouse behind the Wheel. Want to have a look?

Fam Mouse - cover

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Let’s get disabled kids in developing countries to school

USA - Access Exchange International

This illustration shows how it should be: Disabled kids in developing countries should be able to get to school using a variety of accessible transport in order to learn alongside other kids. We hope you will help us as we work with others to turn this vision into a reality.

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Family Mouse moves ahead on fifty language worldwide Odyssey

Today we want to tell you about a bit more concerning progress on a collaborative international project on a children’s book exactly on our subject. Back in mid March, we announced our intention to produce a 2011  edition of this successful  children’s book, but this time in (our target) fifty language editions. Read on to see where things stand today. All the more  if any of you out there might be interested in lending a hand so that we can create handsome print and electronic versions for worldwide distribution and use. – Alvin reports from Paris Continue reading

Honey, you gotta slow down

It is the consistent position of this journal that much of what is wrong with our current transportation arrangements in cities could be greatly alleviated if we can find ways just to slow down.  A bare five miles per hour over the speed limit on a city street, and . . . Continue reading

Listening to children

Journal of World Transport Policy and Practice
Volume 15, Number 1. March 2010
Editorial – John Whitelegg:

This issue contains two articles that on first reading may appear totally unrelated. This is not the case. The Kinnersly article – “Transport and climate change on a planet near you ” – is a comprehensive reflection on the links between economic growth, poor quality democracy, lack of will to deal with sustainability and biodiversity and the perversity of reckless decision taking that supports a business as usual (BAU) model of the world.

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Children, Transport and Mobility in Africa Sharing experiences from Ghana, Malawi and South Africa

2010 is the Year of Africa on World Streets, and here you have the first of what we intend will develop into a engaging series of articles, ideas and information on problems, attitudes, responses, barriers and the ingenious work-arounds that African children and adults are so often obliged to find on their own.

This publication was funded by The Africa Community Access Programme (AFCAP) to help us better understand how children look at and deal with day to day challenges of transport and mobility in three African countries.

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