Thinking Exercise: What happens when VKT goes up? Down?

VKT vehilce km miles travel

This flowchart as it stands  gives us a good idea of what happens in today’s dominant mobility pattern in most cities,  where each year the net impact of transport policy (or lack thereof) is to nudge up VKT .  (Actually that should better read MVKT — MOTOR Vehicle Kilometers Traveled , since that brings us right to the main core of the challenge.

Which, if we turn it around and look at it closely, gives us a number of good ideas and targets for our 2020 Five Percent Challenge .  Figure out how to reduce VKT and all sorts of good stuff happens!

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To contact the editor with your observations and eventual questions, drop a line to Climate@newmobility.org.  We answer our mail. 

Eric Britton
13, rue Pasteur. Courbevoie 92400 France

Bio: Founding editor of World Streets (1988), Eric Britton is an American political scientist, teacher, occasional consultant, mediator and sustainability activist who has observed, learned, taught and worked on missions and advisory assignments on all continents. In the autumn of 2019, he committed his remaining life work to the challenges of aggressively countering climate change and specifically greenhouse gas emissions emanating from the mobility sector. He is not worried about running out of work. Further background and updates: @ericbritton | http://bit.ly/2Ti8LsX | #fekbritton | https://twitter.com/ericbritton | and | https://www.linkedin.com/in/ericbritton/ Contact: climate@newmobility.org) | +336 508 80787 (Also WhatApp) | Skype: newmobility.)

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3 thoughts on “Thinking Exercise: What happens when VKT goes up? Down?

  1. Reducing 50% of on-street parking eliminates the convenience of cars. Street parking space can then be used to form connected bike lanes. Electric taxis and TNCs carry multiple passengers becoming the replacement transportation for personal cars. First and last mile connections are now convenient.

    Reply
  2. Great diagram thanks Eric. I notice walking … but not cycling? In some places (eg Australia), a bicycle is defined as a “vehicle” and if included, then what other vehicles would also need to be included eg various powered and unpowered accessibility (disabled access) “vehicles”. But for the purpose and as a reminder than planning and providing for ever higher VKT per capita may be illusory (if not insanity), I like the idea of a focus ONLY on the benefits of prioritising walking.

    Reply

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