The New Circular Economy: Vision, Strategy, Policy, Practice – An Introduction

– Eric Britton, ISG, Paris, 15 November 2017.

An Open Collaborative Policy Research Program

Making some progress in exploring the Circular Economy/Public Policy interface, in the context of our master classes and advisory program on Sustainable Development, Economy and Democracy. Here is how things are starting to shape up at this still early point.

FOCUS: We have set out to explore the Circulart Economy concept in three main supersets:

(1) CIRCULAR ECONOMY – as an emerging paradigm, body of knowledge, analytic strategy and eventual tool set for sustainable development in the 21st century, while at the same time understanding and placing it in its rich historical and intellectual  context.

(2) PUBLIC POLICY INTERFACE – the concept in its many part in support of and supported by public policy (at whatever level of government and civil society, with a particular interest in understanding the potential of local government actions at the level of the city and region)

(3) TARGET SECTORS – Understanding the usefulness of C/E as an emerging policy approach and toolset specifically to explore and uncover the potential for new perspectives on and approaches to (a) MOBILITY/TRANSPORT/LAND USE as one principal target area; (b) for the fast-evolving problems and possibilities in the new world of WORK; and (c) TAXATION and ECONOMIC INSTRUMENTS more generally as strategIES and powerful tools for effecting change.

INITIAL SHORTLIST OF USEFUL C/E REFERENCES: (work in process)

* Program overview: https://sustainabiltyseminar.wordpress.com/tag/circular-economy/

* Facebook: Circular Economy: Vision, Strategy, Policy, Practice – https://goo.gl/3i8hRg

* LinkedIn: Circular Economy on – https://www.linkedin.com/groups/8617587

* C/E Newsroomhttps://goo.gl/ee1p3p

* Reference Bookshelf: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AivPCmA_7fpkh_0qYfxT0IX98O5ivg

* Bibliographies (in process): https://wp.me/p1zD54-11f and https://wp.me/p1zD54-11B

* Selected videoshttps://goo.gl/RhJoxx

* Core reading: (to follow)

CONTACT

Want to help improve this guide for students and others interested? Get in touch with us via email to CircularEconomy@ecoplan.org – or Skype:  newmobility (in one word)

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About the author:

Eric Britton
9, rue Gabillot, 69003 Lyon France

Bio: Educated as a development economist, Francis Eric Knight-Britton is an American political scientist, teacher and sustainability activist who has worked on missions and advisory assignments on all continents. Professor of Sustainable Development, Economy and Democracy at the Institut Supérieur de Gestion (Paris), he is MD of EcoPlan Association, an independent non-profit advisory network providing strategic counsel for government and business on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change, civil society and sustainable development. Founding editor of World Streets: The Politics of Transport in Cities | See Britton online at https://goo.gl/9CJXTh, @ericbritton. @worldstreets and britton@ecoplan.org

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Early signs of Circular Spring:

In 1929 a young Russian economist and eventual lauriat of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, (1975) Wassily Wassilyovich Leontief wrote a pathbreaking article on the  concept of a circular economy, under the title “Die Wirtschaft als Kreislauf” which became available in English only in 1990, with the title translated as “The economy as a circular flow. Structural Change and Economic Dynamics”.

Reminder:
Wassily Wassilyovich Leontief was a Russian-American economist renowned for his input–output theory of capital for which he received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in the year 1973. His works in general and the input–output theory in particular were instrumental in understanding how the output of a particular sector influenced another sector of the economy. His studies transcended the bridge that economists tended to keep with raw empirical data during his time. Another facet of his studies was the use of computers at a time when most studies relied on theoretical suppositions. Apart from a meticulous researcher, he was also a great teacher, training four future Nobel Laureates during his years at Harvard. He was a thinker; but believed that theories were no good unless they were backed by facts. Source:

# # #

About the author:

Eric Britton
9, rue Gabillot, 69003 Lyon France

Bio: Educated as a development economist, Francis Eric Knight-Britton is an American political scientist, teacher and sustainability activist who has worked on missions and advisory assignments on all continents. Professor of Sustainable Development, Economy and Democracy at the Institut Supérieur de Gestion (Paris), he is MD of EcoPlan Association, an independent non-profit advisory network providing strategic counsel for government and business on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change, civil society and sustainable development. Founding editor of World Streets: The Politics of Transport in Cities | See Britton online at https://goo.gl/9CJXTh, @ericbritton. @worldstreets and britton@ecoplan.org

View complete profile

 

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