Organizing our thoughts on Slowth (Slow Cities)

Change the way you move

Credit: Simphewe Nkwali (Eco-Mobiliy Johannesburg

The  Slow Movement) advocates a cultural shift toward slowing down life’s pace. It began with Carlo Petrini‘s protest against the opening of a McDonald’s restaurant in Piazza di Spagna, Rome in 1986 that sparked the creation of the slow food movement. Over time, this developed into a subculture in other areas, like the Cittaslow organisation for “slow cities”. The “slow” epithet has subsequently been applied to a variety of activities and aspects of culture.

What is  more important to you this morning?  That your trip is fast?  Or quick?

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Toward a new paradigm for transport in cities: Let’s see what Carlos Pardo has to say

UL 20 is plenty with bikeThe construction of a well-defined, broadly accepted agenda for New Mobility  until the present time has been sadly lacking. But what we and a numb er of our international colleagues have managed to develop over the last two decades is a certain number of agreed basic principles spanning many different areas and kinds of operational situations, but somehow until now we have failed to put them all together into a well-defined, convincing operational and policy package. We think of this as the move toward a new paradigm for transport in cities – and it all starts with . . . slowing down.

Today I would like to extract and comment on some of the graphics and thoughts developed by our colleague Carlosfelipe Pardo in a presentation which he entitled “The psychology of urban mobility”. I have extracted from his presentation three sets of images which I would now like to present you and comment briefly. (For the full original presentation please click here.)

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