Penang Institute comments the Penang Transport Master Plan

Penang Institute header

Penang Institute welcomes this opportunity to provide comment on the Penang Transport Master Plan (PTMP) proposals which have recently been shared with us. We hope that the following comments are taken in the spirit intended and we welcome an opportunity to discuss the issues raised further.

We commend the State for taking a bold and ambitious approach to the development of new transport infrastructure and would welcome an opportunity to help shape proposals so that they deliver optimal outcomes for Penang now, and far into the future.

The Penang Transport Master Plan provides an opportunity for Penang to significantly raise the development trajectory, but also offers an opportunity to leapfrog the mistakes of the West, and pursue a sustainable development path that will place Penang at the forefront of city development, making Penang a truly international and intelligent city.

Penang institute Staff

The following analysis and recommendations for the PTMP were submitted by Mr. Stuart MacDonaldHead of Urban Studies of the Penang Institute on 21 December 2015. They are reproduced here in their entirety as submitted.

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The Three Worlds of Cycling

finland heslinki nice bike scene traffic
There are three “worlds” of cycling — and perhaps surprisingly they have very little to do with each other.

Two are much appreciated by those who practice them and are quite easy to do.

While the third often appears to be close to impossible. But it is far more important than the rest combined and multiplied by a thousand.

Let’s have a look. (And pleas also check out the critical comments that follow.)

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The Three Worlds of cycling (Working draft)

Not as simple as it may look

Not as simple as it may look

There are three “worlds” of cycling, and surprisingly they have very little to do with each other.  Two are quite easy to do, while one is close to impossible, but far more important than the rest. Let’s have a look.

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No footover bridges in the name of clean air!!

China pedestrian bridge traffic

stairs to pedestrian bridge

Enjoy your trip

The following is a brilliant and important exchange on a topic that has a rich double meaning that is really worth getting across our idea-resistant noggins (heads, if you will) once and for all. If you believe that the most universal, the most fundamental, certainly the most responsible, even the noblest form of getting round is when we can make our trips safely by foot (or wheelchair if that is what we need to be independently mobile), than you as a responsible politician, administrator, planner or engaged voter, simply would not even for one minute consider engaging in this kind of folly.

So what you have here is an exchange that got started more than five years, and to which Syed Saiful Alam has so well stated in the last posting in this short series, when he stubbornly repeats “No footover bridges in the name of clean air!!”, “No footover bridges in the name of clean air!!”.

Let’s take their postings in chrono order.

# # #
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Gatnet 2.0: Gearing up for 2016

Dear Gatnet Friends and Colleagues,
zetabyte-image-largeWhen Priyanthi Fernando decided to invite an innovative month-long peer dialogue on Gender Mainstreaming in Rural Transport in November, I was fascinated by her idea on several scores.  First, the topic itself and very curious to see what the 150 or so people from various corners of the world signed into Gatnet would have to share and create together on this subject. And second, I was intrigued to see how our somewhat sagging original Dgroups website package was going to be able to support these exchanges. So I decided to jump in with both feet and as the exchanges moved along, I was struck by two things in turn.

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Saudi Historian Says U.S. Women Drive Because They Don’t Care If They’re Raped

Saudi historian - they dont care if they are raped

Click HERE for 2 minute video with captions

Dear Gatnet Friends

Before we get to the content of what the eminent Saudi Historian has to say on this relevant topic of women who want to be raped, let me take you quickly to our Gatnet 2.0 site and show you how you can put to work one of the special tools we have developed to support the collaborative work at Gatnet. Happily, these rather simple tools are also more generally to anyone anywhere who happens to share our interest in the complex topic of women, transport and equity in our oh so different societies.

The particular tool I would like to draw to your attention today is our so-call KNOOGLE (yes, an ugly word) combined search engine, to which you can go directly here – – https://gatnet.wordpress.com/links-sources-2/searching-all-links/.

Now, to show you a sample of how this works, this morning I wanted to know more about the site of the local elections in Saudi Arabia where for the first time 130,000 women registered to vote and when the ballots were counted more than a dozen  of these heroes have been elected to local office — for the first time.

So I scrolled down on the right menu here where it indicates  KNOOLGE, and popped in the single key word “Saudi” which called up a very large number of entries, with coverage of the latest developments in the voting situation right up top.  With the eminent Saudi historian’s remarks toward the end of the first page of entries.

And now if you wish, let’s take a look at that article and see if we can understand what the good gentleman has in mind:

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Survival of the Fittest – Gender and Public Transport in Kathmandu

Nepal crowding minibus women

* Click for 4 minute video: http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/video/2014/03/17/gender-public-transport-in-nepal

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New Gatnet 2.0 Combined Search Engine – Trial run

magnifying glassWe invite you to try this on the topic of our November Dialogue led by Pri  in Dgroups Gatnet site at https://dgroups.org/worldbank/gatnet/ .
 
1. Call up our in-process Gatnet 2.0 search engine – https://goo.gl/EOjBpI
 
2. Pop in the following keywords: “gender mainstreaming rural transport”
 
3. Have a look and if your time permits it would be useful for improving this tool if you might share your comments and suggestions.
 
That’s just one way of checking it out. You will quickly see its potential.
 
Again, your critical comments and suggestions more than welcome
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WOMEN, CYCLING, ETC. – A CONVERSATION AMONG FRIENDS

(An unstructured chat among fellow cyclists. Definitely  not a questionnaire) 

children with push balance bikesA. YOU AND CYCLING

1. You are a woman    YES________/No __________

2. You have a bicycle  YES________/No __________

3. You ride a bicycle fairly often in your day to day life as “normal transport:  YES______/No ____

4. You find that is not always that easy, safe or agreeable to use a bike in your city. YES____/No _____ (City name)_______________________________

5. You understand that in different places/cultures actually having and riding a bike for a woman is not all that easy, for many reasons. . . YES________/No ______________

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Standing upon the shoulders of giants

From: Protasio Chipulu, Programme Coordinator.
Rural Accessibility and Mobility Programme. Lusaka, Zambia

Sent: 09 December 2015
ref: Gatnet: Gearing up for 2016

Dear Eric,

I went to the search engine ; https://goo.gl/fDb0n

In the window I typed Gender Mainstreaming in rural transport.  I found a catalogue of publications on the subject and this I find to be very useful for my work and for my research.

What you have created is very innovate and good platform to use for use in promoting our agenda.  I will share this site with my colleagues in the sector.

How can we include other publications which I can get from my country?

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Gatnet: Gearing up for 2016

Dear Gatnet Friends and Colleagues,
zetabyte-image-largeWhen Priyanthi Fernando decided to invite us to an month-long peer dialogue on Gender Mainstreaming in Rural Transport, I was fascinated by . . .  First, the topic itself and was very curious to see what the 150 or so people from various corners of the world signed into Gatnet would have share and create together on this subject. And second I was intrigued to see how our somewhat sagging original Dgroups website package was going to be able to support these exchanges. So I decided to jump in with both feet and as the exchanges moved along, I was struck by two things in turn.

First, how much we have to learn from each other. And second, what a barely adequate platform we had to work with dear old Dgroups.  So at the same time following what Pri, Hans, Salma, Gina, Prakash, Batel, Jun, Randy, Protasio, Andrea, Serge, Robert, Paul, Gifty, Nite, Peter, Maria, Lucy, Vero, Holy, Barney, Solomon, Tim, Jeff, and I am sure I have forgotten one or two of us — I quickly came to the conclusion that we were not all that well served by the original decade old Dgroups technology. Yes, it functions decently as a listserv, but it is basically a closed system, difficult to sort through and for quite some time the Search function has not worked at all.  And it is media poor.  Your work deserves more and better.

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Gender, Equity and Transport in . . . Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Cameroon, Canada. . .

fb india ladies at bus stop in rain

Gender, Equity and Transport Forum 2.0

Who  do  you  know  who  is giving these critical challenges of gender, equity and transport their consistent attention, place after place, year after year and measure after measure in  . . . Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Ghana, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Ivory Coast, Japan, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mexico, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Republic of the  Congo, Rwanda, Senegal, Solomon,  Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom, United,States, Vietnam, Zambia and Zimbabwe. And who talk to each other about it?

Have you heard about Gatnet?  A community of practice and public policy program on Gender and Transport, addressing the problems of women, particularly Southern women and girls, facing the everyday reality of gender inequality in the transport sector. The program deals with specific problems in specific places in Africa, Asia and Latin America, both cities and in very poor outlying rural areas where safe and fair access is an enormous problem of day to day life, often falling especially hard on women and young girls.

Let’s have a look.

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