Conference 16 Nov. 2015, Brussels: Smart Mobility Planning

Smart Mobility Planning – The Innovative Evaluation Toolkit

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NISTO Final Conference I 16th of November 2015. Brussels,Belgium

* Participation in the conference is free.

Invitation to European Conference

As the NISTO project is closing at the end of the year, the project partnership organises the NISTO Final Conference, which is to be held at the Represenation of the State of Hessen to the EU in Brussels on 16th November. NISTO project partners will proudly present the NISTO toolkit for smart integrated mobility planning in Europe, the first toolkit combining the Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA), Social Cost-Benefit Analysis (SCBA), Multi-Actor Multi-Criteria Analysis (MAMCA) and target monitoring. Moreover interesting Workshops and Keynotes focussing on the keys of NISTO digitalisation, participation and sustainability in mobility planning are scheduled. International experts are going to discuss the latest developments and topics with policy makers.

Date: 16th of November 2015

Event Location:  Representation of the State of Hessen to the EU (21, Rue Montoyer, 1000 Brussels, Belgium)
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From the archives: Lee Schipper on the Perils of Asia’s Hyper-Motorization

This article by the late Lee Schipper appeared in the pages of World Streets several weeks before his death, at far too young an age.  And here four years later, as we continue to struggle to find ways to make our sector less catastrophically destructive and more people- and  climate-friendly, you will find that his tough words and uncompromising arguments are every bit as relevent today as they were back in 2011.  Why, one might ask, are we so very slow to learn?aThe editor. World Streets, Paris. 3 August 2011.

Our old friend and long time colleague Lee Schipper is sitting in a hospital bed in Berkeley California today, and since your editor is stuck in Paris and can’t visit him, we thought that while he gets his strength back we would  reach into our and others archives and publish a series of pieces to celebrate his deep knowledge of all that World Streets is about, his  excellent judgement and his world level communications skills. (And if you have something by Lee that you would like to share with our readers as we wait for him to swing back into action, please send it on.)

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Invisibilities: How to look at (for) something that is purported to be invisible

MAN HEAD IN SAND

In the city, as in life, as we make our way around it we normally register only what we set out to look for. The anomalies, the absences, the troubling, somehow escape our attention. Consciously or not. But when it comes to matters of transport and public spaces, everywhere the eye might wander there are valuable clues, both visible and invisible, for planners, policy makers and the concerned citizen. However, if we fail to use our eyes we miss out on valuable information. And as a result our cities do just that much less well.

With this in mind we have made a selection of fifty wildly different photographs from the working archives of World Streets, which have been culled from more than three thousand  images and which one by one can help us to  better understand the almost infinitely variable challenges of sustainable transport, sustainable cities and sustainable lives.  I call these  “Invisibilities” reminding us to all of the many things that go on in our sector which we often fail to look at. This is a universal problem, and my hope here is to encourage us all, myself included, to be more fully attentive to the human side of transportation.

(We propose that you look at this with the full screen setting bottom right just above.)

Continue reading

Invisibilities: How to look at (for) something that is purported to be invisible

MAN HEAD IN SAND

In the city, as in life, as we make our way around it we normally register only what we set out to look for. The anomalies, the absences, the troubling, somehow escape our attention. Consciously or not. But when it comes to matters of transport and public spaces, everywhere the eye might wander there are valuable clues, both visible and invisible, for planners, policy makers and the concerned citizen. However, if we fail to use our eyes we miss out on valuable information. And as a result our cities do just that much less well.

With this in mind we have made a selection of fifty wildly different photographs from the working archives of World Streets, which have been culled from more than three thousand  images and which one by one can help us to  better understand the almost infinitely variable challenges of sustainable transport, sustainable cities and sustainable lives.  I call these  “Invisibilities” reminding us to all of the many things that go on in our sector which we often fail to look at. This is a universal problem, and my hope here is to encourage us all, myself included, to be more fully attentive to the human side of transportation.

(We propose that you look at this with the full screen setting bottom right just above.)

Continue reading

McKinsey on Urban Mobility at a Tipping Point

uk-traffic light tree-smallThis thoughtful article by a team from McKinsey & Company puts together the pieces of the urban mobility revolution in some original ways, to present a challenging view of the future of urban mobility worldwide.

We publish selected brief extracts here to get you going and if you then wish to turn to the full text and illustrations which you will find – – – > here.

The speed and extent of the mobility transformation will differ. In this report, we lay out a framework that describes the evolution of urban mobility. We also highlight a set of urban archetypes, defined by population density and the maturity of public transit; each archetype can be expected to take a different path to mobility. Our analysis suggests that a mobility revolution is on the way for much of the world. As a result, we anticipate big improvements in the quality of life for city residents.

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