The Ten Commandments for Drivers

Together with Enrico Bonfatti, editor of our sister publication Nuova Mobilità, we have been working on a series of articles on “Street Codes”. In doing this we came across “The Ten Commandments for drivers”, issued by the Roman Catholic Church in 2007. And on the grounds that sustainable transportation is an open, even ecumenical movement that welcomes good ideas and good behavior from all, here is our rough translation of that document.

The Ten Commandments for Drivers (“I Dieci comandamenti per chi guida”) was published in Italy on 19 June 2007 by an organ of the Catholic Church, as part of a larger proclamation entitled Pastoral Guidelines for Migrants and Itinerant People (“Pontificio Consiglio della Pastorale per i Migranti e gli Itineranti”). The full document is available in Italian at http://212.77.1.245/news_services/bulletin/news/20450.php?index=20450〈=it

Here is our rough translation of the ten points of that document.

1. Thou shalt not kill.

2. The road is an instrument of communion between people, and not the place of mortal danger

3. Courtesy, direct behavior and prudence will help thee overcome the unexpected

4. Thou shalt be charitable and help your neighbor in need, especially if the victim of an accident.

5. Thy car is not an expression of power, dominance, or an opportunity for sin.

6. Thou shalt step forward to convince the young, and others who are not fully able, not to take the wheel of the car when not in a condition to do so.

7. Thou shalt give care for the families of victims of accidents.

8. Thou shalt help to organize meetings between the victim and the aggressing driver at an opportune moment, so that they can share the liberating experience of forgiveness.

9. Thou shalt always protect the weaker party on the road.

10. Feel thyself accountable to others.

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Hard to argue with that. Comments?

PS. Yes and we meant “ecumenical” in its first dictionary meaning, from the Greek “oikoumenikos”, the inhabited world. That’s us. And we’d better take care of it.

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